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When did Church of England allow divorcees to marry?

When did Church of England allow divorcees to marry?

2002
The Church of England has allowed divorced people to remarry in church, subject to a priest’s discretion, since 2002. At the General Synod meeting of that year, 269 members voted in favour of allowing Christian remarriage compared to 83 against.

When did the church allow divorcees to marry?

The rules were almost certainly breached informally. But it was only in 2002 that the General Synod, the church’s legislative body, allowed remarriage in church of divorced people whose former partners were still alive, in “exceptional circumstances”.

Why does the Church of England allow divorce?

The Church of England teaches that marriage is for life. It also recognizes that some marriages sadly do fail and, if this should happen, it seeks to be available for all involved. The Church accepts that, in exceptional circumstances, a divorced person may marry again in church during the lifetime of a former spouse.

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Why does the Church of England not allow divorce?

Like most other Christian religions of the time, the Church of England mirrored societal stigmas against divorce. England’s monarchs reflected the laws of their church, even as divorce laws became more liberal. At first, though it was possible to legally divorce, Parliament had to grant the dissolution of the marriage.

Did the Church of England allow divorce?

At first, though it was possible to legally divorce, Parliament had to grant the dissolution of the marriage. Nor did Church of England doctrine: Until 2002, the church would not recognize the marriage of any divorced person whose ex-spouse was still living.

Why did the Catholic Church ban divorce?

Christian leaders believed divorce was immoral and marriage should be indissoluble. Catholic scholars believed celibacy was a superior spiritual state to marriage and that it was better to be married than commit the sin of fornication.