Articles

Are interested to or in?

Are interested to or in?

“Interested in” is used when what comes after it is a noun, or a verb acting like a noun (known as a gerund). “Interested to” is used when what comes after it is a verb in its “to form” (known as an infinitive). “I am interested in starting my career in your company” is the preferred construction.

Can you say interested by?

So if you can easily turn it around and say Some object/thing/person interests me, then it is probably okay to say interested by. If you are the person who draws initial interest (because of less apparent reasons), say interested in.

Is it interested in or interested with?

I was interested to hear that Jake had divorced Sarah. When we use “interested” with a verb that is not a verb of perception, “interested in” is the only correct option. Correct: I am interested in reading. Incorrect: I am interested to reading.

READ ALSO:   Can you identify dyslexia before school?

Is interested in something?

Being interested in something is like being physically connected to it, making you feel as if you cannot move away. Something that is interesting seems to pull you towards it or take hold of you. These are the kind of issues that really engage people.

Is involved in synonym?

In this page you can discover 97 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for involved, like: engaged, associated, in-on, immersed, incriminated, implicated, wrapped, committed, required, dedicated and engrossed.

Which preposition is used after Interested?

Get It Right! When the noun interest means ‘a feeling of wanting to know more about something’, it is followed by the preposition in, not for: ✗ There is a growing interest for other cultures and philosophies. ✓ There is a growing interest in other cultures and philosophies.

Is ‘I and someone are interested’ grammatically correct?

“I and someone are interested” is grammatically correct. It is the convention in English that when you list several people including yourself, you put yourself last, so you really should say “Someone and I are interested.” “Someone and I” is the subject of the sentence, so you should use the subjective case “I” rather than the objective “me”.

READ ALSO:   What does it mean when someone leaves money on your windshield?

Is it correct to say interested by or interested in?

So if you can easily turn it around and say Some object/thing/person interests me, then it is probably okay to say interested by. If you are the person who draws initial interest (because of less apparent reasons), say interested in.

What is the difference between “in­Ter­est­ing to” and “at­tracted to?

This sen­tence means that you are at­tracted to Eng­lish lit­er­a­ture; you find it in­ter­est­ing and would like to know more about it. On the other hand, “in­ter­ested to” may be used when you want to ob­tain more in­for­ma­tion about a fact, as in I’d be interested to see whether the new drug helps to cure the disease.

How do you ask someone if they are interested in something?

Always be interested in interesting things Consider a conversation like this – Jon – “Hey Mac, are you interested in doing something interesting?” Mac – “Of course, I am more than interested. Tell me more about it.” Jon – “You sound quite interested to know more.