General

How about you is correct sentence?

How about you is correct sentence?

Technically speaking, this is not grammatically correct. A sentence requires a subject and a verb, and there is no verb in “How about you?”. However, it is perfectly acceptable to say, “How ’bout you?” in the following, informal exchange: A: Hey, Sam!

What is the meaning of How about you?

Definition of how about you —used to ask someone to tell one something in response to what one has just said I like skiing and hiking. How about you? What do you like? I’m ready to go. How about you?

How about you is this correct?

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However, it can work as a very short phrase: “Yourself?” “How about you?” is grammatically correct and works in both formal and informal settings. Normally a sentence should have a verb to be formally correct. The statement” how about you?” has no verb.

Is how about yourself grammatically correct?

How about yourself is grammatically incorrect. When using reflexive pronouns, you should use a subject at least once, although you can have an implied use to e.g.. You did that to yourself or (You) Look at yourselves. It is grammatically correct to say How about you, yourself, but that’s pretty clunky.

How about you or what about you which is correct?

Furthermore, a general rule of thumb is that ‘how about you’ is usually used when asking about feelings, emotions, or anything personal, while, ‘what about you’ is used when asking about objects or places. For example: “I’m getting bored staying in the house all day.

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Is I seen ever correct?

I seen is never correct. Seen is the third form of the verb see- see/saw/seen. Seen is the past participle used together with a part of the verb to be to form the passive voice: It was seen by many people – meaning – Many people saw it.

What is the meaning of “I haven’t seen her since”?

“Since” requires an object that is an event, a ‘point’ in time. The ‘point’ can be quite broad. For example, “I haven’t seen her since the last millennium.” is correct. It is to be interpreted as “I haven’t seen her since some time in the last millennium.”

Is “I haven’t seen her in the last few years” correct?

For example, “I haven’t seen her since the last millennium.” is correct. It is to be interpreted as “I haven’t seen her since some time in the last millennium.” “I haven’t seen her in the last few years.” is correct, but I’d prefer the shorter “I haven’t seen her in/for a few years.” “The last” is redundant.

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Can You Say “I haven’t seen someone since a year ago?

No. The word “since” implies up until the present, as in the period of time in which you haven’t seen the person have not ended yet, or you have still not seen the person yet since a year ago. Hence, you would say

Did you not see him for the whole of last year?

If you wish to convey, however, that you did not see “him” for the whole of last year, but that period of not seeing him has already ended, say, yesterday, when you saw him again for the first time since last year, you would say No.